10056-x:

[image description: quotes from the zine “Self as other: Reflections on self care” plus image of zine title. Quotes read:

If self-care is just a way to ease the impact of an ever-increasing demand for productivity, rather than a transformative rejection of that demand, it’s part of the problem, not the solution.

and

Your human frailty is not a regrettable fault to be treated by proper self-care so you can get your nose back to the grindstone. Sickness, disability, and unproductivity are not anomalies to be weeded out; they are moments that occur in every life, offering a common ground on which we might come together.

also in image: yellow decorative dots; the words (in red) “this is an amazing zine” and beneath that (in black) “source: Crimethinc www.crimethinc.com”]
zine is available here: http://www.crimethinc.com/blog/2013/09/06/new-zine-about-self-care-self-as-other/

10056-x:

[image description: quotes from the zine “Self as other: Reflections on self care” plus image of zine title. Quotes read:

If self-care is just a way to ease the impact of an ever-increasing demand for productivity, rather than a transformative rejection of that demand, it’s part of the problem, not the solution.

and

Your human frailty is not a regrettable fault to be treated by proper self-care so you can get your nose back to the grindstone. Sickness, disability, and unproductivity are not anomalies to be weeded out; they are moments that occur in every life, offering a common ground on which we might come together.

also in image: yellow decorative dots; the words (in red) “this is an amazing zine” and beneath that (in black) “source: Crimethinc www.crimethinc.com”]

zine is available here: http://www.crimethinc.com/blog/2013/09/06/new-zine-about-self-care-self-as-other/

ltle:

I’m looking for letters to the editor to be included in the inaugural issue of LTLE.

Some will be featured or quoted on the site, but my intention is for the main project to be printed, not online. Everyone who is included in the zine will get a copy of the zine. This can be in pdf…

I’ve been getting some excellent submissions so far, including a record two-word long letter. Does anyone want to write me a one-word long letter?

I’ve started designing the layout, backgrounds, etc. for the submissions I have already received. I dusted off my typewriter - it still works! Yay!

I’ve meant to post more about this, but various things (assignment deadlines, proposal deadlines, other pieces of my life, my own brain, etc.) have distracted me somewhat.

ALSO: I am going to extend the deadline to October 31st. I figured if I need more time then so does everyone else.

Send letters to the editor

ltle:

I’m looking for letters to the editor to be included in the inaugural issue of LTLE.

Some will be featured or quoted on the site, but my intention is for the main project to be printed, not online. Everyone who is included in the zine will get a copy of the zine. This can be in pdf form if you don’t want to/can’t provide a postal address.

Submissions are in the style of a letter to the editor, so up to about 200 words. The minimum word count is one word. Include the name (and location, if you wish) under which you want the letter to be credited. The name and location can be fictional and/or outrageous if you wish.

Deadline for issue one is October 10th, 2014.

Submit in the submissions box or by emailing: hello [@] noparticularbusiness.com

For more information about what I’m trying to achieve with this zine, try the about page.

zine-reviews:

I made a thing!  Queer Sailor Moon Fanfiction Saved My Life is a personal zine about how online fan communities helped me stay alive through some bad preteen times. I look back on, and quote at length from, the Sailor Moon and Spice Girls fanfiction I read as a kid and talk about what it meant to me. I’m not really sure if this zine is funny or sad, so it’s probably both.  Content warnings for trauma, suicide, abuse, & body image stuff.
You can buy it on Etsy, if you wanna!  Or if you know me in life I will give you a copy next time I see you.

I bought this last week. I love it!
I used to love Harry Potter fanfiction when I was about 15. I wanted to BE Severus Snape.
I went looking for all my favourite stories from 2002. They’re all still there; it’s amazing.

zine-reviews:

I made a thing!  Queer Sailor Moon Fanfiction Saved My Life is a personal zine about how online fan communities helped me stay alive through some bad preteen times. I look back on, and quote at length from, the Sailor Moon and Spice Girls fanfiction I read as a kid and talk about what it meant to me. I’m not really sure if this zine is funny or sad, so it’s probably both.  Content warnings for trauma, suicide, abuse, & body image stuff.

You can buy it on Etsy, if you wanna!  Or if you know me in life I will give you a copy next time I see you.

I bought this last week. I love it!

I used to love Harry Potter fanfiction when I was about 15. I wanted to BE Severus Snape.

I went looking for all my favourite stories from 2002. They’re all still there; it’s amazing.

When sound words take over and hurt

realsocialskills:

I hate sound words. They hurt so bad. People do sound words and they keep doing them for hours. They never stop it. I put my hands on my ears. They don’t like that because it’s innappropriate.
The only way I can stop the sound words is hit my head so I hear the hitting. I sometimes like the words that are on books. Other people don’t like those words.
They said if I do therapy I won’t hurt anymore. I did it for eight years. I still hate sound words. Therapist sound words hurt more than other people’s sound words. How do I get them to stop talking? They won’t stop talking. I say stop talking but it’s rude.
realsocialskills said: 
 
I don’t know a great answer to this. I think I have the same problem sometimes. Here are some things I think I know about it:
  
Words bother me sometimes, but not all the time. But sometimes words hurt and I’m in a sea of words and everything is bad of words and talking and people’s words that hurt and take over everything.
 
The problem is real, and it’s not your fault, and no one really knows how to make words stop hurting. You are not alone. There are other people who words hurt. There are other people who like book words. There are other people who like to be around people without talking to them.
  
(And it makes sense that therapist words would hurt more. Therapist words are designed to get past defenses and get in when you’re keeping other words out. Which can be a good thing in some contexts, but not like this.)
  
You probably can’t get most people who like sound words to stop talking so much. They are made of words, a lot. Words are really important to them. That is how they communicate and show respect for each other. Some people can also communicate in other modes, but a lot of people need words. 
  
So probably “get them to stop talking” isn’t the right solution. I think people who live in words are going to want to talk most of the time. The solution might be more… finding space to be away from people who are made of words, and finding friends who aren’t made of words. Finding space they don’t control. Being able to separate yourself from the people who words at you constantly.
 
Not everyone is made of sound-words. Some people like non-words or book words. I don’t know how to meet them on purpose, but I have met others and spent very pleasant time interacting without wordsing much. So I know that it is possible.
  
And some people only words at you because when words-people words at them they get pushed into words-mode. So some of them can be good friends for not-made-of-words interactions if you can find ways to spend time with them without the all the sound words people. And some of them will understand what you mean if you tell them that there are too many words and ask them to interact another way. 
  
I think part of the solution might be finding ways to get away from the people who are wordsing at you all the time. Do you have any private space you can go to? Or any space where you can control who is invited in?
  
Are there any people you can find to hang out with who don’t use words at all? People who don’t make sound words might be better people for you to be friends with.
 
Do you like movies? If you like movies, sometimes watching movies can be a way to spend time for people without talking to them. Most people think that you are not supposed to talk during movies. I wonder if it might help to say “Can we interact like we were watching a movie? Like, with us both paying attention but not talking?” I haven’t tried that, but I think I have friends it would work for as a way of explaining.
  
If you’re at school or something and people keep talking to you, it can sometimes help to say something like “I need quiet to focus” or “I need to work on this”, or “I’m sorry, but I have a deadline coming and I can’t talk right now.” It can also sometimes help to work in a place like the library where talking is discouraged.
 
It can sometimes help to wear headphones, even if you are not listening to music. It can make things quieter and it is also often taken as an acceptable signal for “I don’t want to talk to anyone right now now.” It doesn’t work all the time, but it does work sometimes.
I don’t know if any of that was answering the right question. I feel like I probably missed something important. You sound trapped in a way that’s not your fault, and I wish people would leave you alone. I wish I knew better answers.
 
Do any of y’all have answers to this? What do you do when everything is full of words and it hurts? How do you find people who won’t words at you all the time, or who will stop wordsing when it hurts?

It sucks that it’s considered rude to tell people to stop talking, and also considered rude to put your hands over your ears as a protective defense. Seems like at least one of those things ought to be ok.

It’s difficult to teach people to stop making sound words at you, because most people will only realise that’s what you need when you give them verbal instructions. For me, the times when I suffer the most from sound words is also the time when I can’t express things verbally, or even concentrate on anything at all, because too much of my energy is taken up with the pain of sound.

I’ve been meaning to make little cards or notes that have these messages/instructions on them, to help me tell people these things. I think if I teach myself to use pre-written notes like that… that might be a partial solution. Maybe that sort of thing would help you too?

pointless-letters:

And here was me thinking the Scots were supposed to be the ones canny with money…Moira could teach us all a thing or two!
(spotted and originally tweeted by Sophy Ridge over on Twitter, tweeted in the direction of Pointless Letters by Lydia Smith on Twitter and Stuart here on Tumblr - many thanks!)

I spent $20 on postage this morning. This is what I get for having all my relatives in Australia.

pointless-letters:

And here was me thinking the Scots were supposed to be the ones canny with money…Moira could teach us all a thing or two!

(spotted and originally tweeted by Sophy Ridge over on Twitter, tweeted in the direction of Pointless Letters by Lydia Smith on Twitter and Stuart here on Tumblr - many thanks!)

I spent $20 on postage this morning. This is what I get for having all my relatives in Australia.

rhiannonbrock:

“Putting down your phone doesn’t equal putting real work into empathy, just as not actively pursuing sex doesn’t equal granting women the status of complete human beings in your mind. Fetishizing “presence” by telling everyone to stop staring at their phones perpetuates the myth that simply being around other people automatically means you’re attuned or empathetic to them. As if it’s impossible to have a real, face-to-face conversation with someone and still fail to take in a single word they’re saying. As if it’s impossible to spend hours staring at Facebook and still be a good friend to your real friends later.”

— Emma Healy, ‘Disrupters, Disconnectionists, and Dicks’ (The Hairpin)

I also like this, from the next paragraph:

"The real work of “connecting” is still just in learning to live with ourselves, and others, and our faults, and not stop caring."

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